Category Archives: Infographics

Graphic of the Week: How to reduce emissions fast enough?

According to most estimates, we really are running out of time for the required CO2 emission reductions. Even if we were to achieve peak emissions by 2016, we’d still need global emission reduction rates of around 3% per year – … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Graphic of the week: The great “80% of world’s energy could be generated from renewables” fallacy

Is a future without fossil fuels and without nuclear truly feasible? In 2011, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, or SRREN. The report sought to determine the … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Graphic of the week: Comparing land use of wind and nuclear energy

Nuclear energy is often claimed to be environmentally harmful technology, especially when contrasted with renewables such as wind power. However, these claims are rarely accompanied by proper sources. This may be because comparisons using actual science do not really support … Continue reading

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , | 28 Comments

“Graph” of the Week: What happens if nuclear waste repository leaks?

Lately, I’ve been spending some time reading through reports on nuclear waste management. What is striking is how conservative the calculations seem to be; for example, the report by Posiva (the Finnish company responsible for the world’s first civilian nuclear … Continue reading

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , | 15 Comments

“Graph” of the Week: Fukushima tritium leak in context

The “massive” tritium leak to sea from Fukushima since 2011 equals the tritium content of about 22 to 44 self-luminescent EXIT signs. More info about exit signs here: http://www.dep.state.pa.us/brp/radiation_control_division/tritium.htm

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

The stagnation of clean energy, with more detail

Inspired by Mark Lynas’s new book “Nuclear 2.0” and Roger Pielke Jr’s excellent post “Clean Energy Stagnation,” here’s my graph of the week. It’s the same graph used by Pielke fils, showing the clean energy as a share of world’s primary … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Electricity generation statistics: this time with five countries :)

The previous post had a simple graph showing electricity generation in four sample countries. Two of the countries had chosen to embrace nuclear energy, while two are known as the champions of renewable energy (wind, solar, biomass, and wave power). … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons | Tagged , , | 2 Comments