Tag Archives: Graphic of the week

Graphic of the Week: How fast has low-carbon energy been built?

This data, and other evidence, make it puzzling how one of the most common refrains against using nuclear power to combat climate change is still that it is too slow. Surely, those people cannot be saying that renewables are by implication far too slow? Continue reading

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Graphic of the Week: Estimates of world energy consumption to 2100, and renewables generation to 2050

The question, therefore, is this: should we gamble literally everything on the off chance that the most optimistic renewable energy proposal has it right, and that the most optimistic energy demand estimate is also correct? Continue reading

Posted in Economy and the Environment, Energy, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Graphic of the Week: Having too much and too little renewables – at the same time

One of the benefits of renewable energy is that it pushes down the price of electricity when the wind blows or the sun shines. Besides lowering energy bills, that kills the profitability of traditional “baseload” power plants – i.e. those … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Graphic of the Week: What’s the required build rate for a sustainable energy system?

One aspect of energy system that’s largely ignored is the ultimate sustainable capacity that can be achieved with a given rate of installation. Accustomed as we are to news about renewables breaking new installation records, we may overlook the fact … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Simulations | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

Graphic of the Week: The hidden “fuels” of renewable energy

It is well known that there is no such thing as a free lunch. However, it is somewhat less known that there is no such thing as free energy, either. Despite all the hoopla about new renewable energy sources being … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Scarcities and constraints | Tagged , , , , | 40 Comments

Graphic of the Week: How to reduce emissions fast enough?

According to most estimates, we really are running out of time for the required CO2 emission reductions. Even if we were to achieve peak emissions by 2016, we’d still need global emission reduction rates of around 3% per year – … Continue reading

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Graphic of the week: The great “80% of world’s energy could be generated from renewables” fallacy

Is a future without fossil fuels and without nuclear truly feasible? In 2011, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, or SRREN. The report sought to determine the … Continue reading

Posted in Ecomodernism, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Graphic of the week: Comparing land use of wind and nuclear energy

Nuclear energy is often claimed to be environmentally harmful technology, especially when contrasted with renewables such as wind power. However, these claims are rarely accompanied by proper sources. This may be because comparisons using actual science do not really support … Continue reading

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“Graph” of the Week: What happens if nuclear waste repository leaks?

Lately, I’ve been spending some time reading through reports on nuclear waste management. What is striking is how conservative the calculations seem to be; for example, the report by Posiva (the Finnish company responsible for the world’s first civilian nuclear … Continue reading

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“Graph” of the Week: Fukushima tritium leak in context

The “massive” tritium leak to sea from Fukushima since 2011 equals the tritium content of about 22 to 44 self-luminescent EXIT signs. More info about exit signs here: http://www.dep.state.pa.us/brp/radiation_control_division/tritium.htm

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