Tag Archives: Infographics

Graphic of the Week: Can nuclear plants load-follow?

…nuclear power can and does “load-follow” as the load in the power grid fluctuates. By doing so, it helps balance out large fluctuations in the production of variable renewables. So, far from being the obstacle to renewable deployment as often claimed, nuclear power seems to be a quite critical part of it. Continue reading

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Graphic of the Week: How fast has low-carbon energy been built?

This data, and other evidence, make it puzzling how one of the most common refrains against using nuclear power to combat climate change is still that it is too slow. Surely, those people cannot be saying that renewables are by implication far too slow? Continue reading

Posted in Economy and the Environment, Energy, Infographics, Nuclear energy & weapons, What they aren't telling you about nuclear power | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Graphic of the Week: Estimates of world energy consumption to 2100, and renewables generation to 2050

The question, therefore, is this: should we gamble literally everything on the off chance that the most optimistic renewable energy proposal has it right, and that the most optimistic energy demand estimate is also correct? Continue reading

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“Graph” of the Week: Fukushima tritium leak in context

The “massive” tritium leak to sea from Fukushima since 2011 equals the tritium content of about 22 to 44 self-luminescent EXIT signs. More info about exit signs here: http://www.dep.state.pa.us/brp/radiation_control_division/tritium.htm

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